Keyword Greenhouse gases

Video
Created: Nov 7 2018
Updated: Nov 7 2018
Agriculture is responsible for 8% of Canada’s greenhouse gas emissions. “It’s part of the problem, but it’s also part of the solution,” says Kunbi Adetona, an energy systems researcher at the University of Calgary. In this video, Adetona talks about the potential of converting manure and other agricultural waste products into biogas, which can offset fossil fuel usage. But what’s really exciting is that researchers have now started converting manure into biochar — or more simply charcoal — which can be used to store carbon in the soil for hundreds of years while improving soil health. “It’s a win-win strategy,” concluded Adetona. “Agriculture could be part of the solutions to the greenhouse gas emissions."
Article
Created: Sep 17 2018
Updated: Oct 16 2018
Canada’s forests are some of the largest in the world. They have enormous economic, cultural, environmental, and recreational value for Canadians of all walks of life. [1]
Article
Created: Apr 2 2018
Updated: Apr 2 2018
The map shows the value for the selected climate variable or index for one of three 30-year time periods: the recent past (1976-2005), the immediate future (2021-2050) and the near future (2051-2080). Future projections are calculated using two possible greenhouse gas emissions scenarios that result in more or less severe levels of climate change.
Video
Created: Mar 26 2018
Updated: Mar 30 2018
Energy transitions are often considered a scientific or technical issue. However, University of Waterloo’s Imre Szeman argues that climate change is fundamentally a cultural issue. He argues that responding to climate change requires a shift in the way we think about cars, energy, chemicals, over-consumption, and other aspects of the fossil-fuel dependent “petrocultures” that permeate our everyday lives.
Article
Created: Feb 17 2017
Updated: Apr 2 2018
Earth’s climate has changed many times and many ways. We know a lot about the natural causes and effects of ancient climate change, and this knowledge helps us state with confidence that modern climate change is a product of human activity.
Article
Created: Mar 19 2018
Updated: Apr 2 2018
Climate change is a large-scale problem, but it’s also a direct result of our collective choices and actions. That means we can make a difference. But how? We’ve been told for years to take environmental and climate action as individuals. Things like upgrading our home insulation, riding our bikes and taking public transit are important, but these small-scale personal choices take place in a wider world. Our social, political, and economic systems also have a responsibility to tackle the climate challenge head on.
Video
Created: Mar 19 2018
Updated: Apr 3 2018
Earth has warmed by 1 °C in just over 100 years. Damon Matthews, a climatologist from Concordia University, describes how this change in temperature is both human-caused and unparalleled in geologic history. Taking us through the evidence of our warming climate, Matthews discusses what these changes mean for Canada and suggests that the case for a dramatic policy response is very clear.
Article
Created: Mar 7 2018
Updated: Apr 2 2018
The most powerful computers on Earth are used to run climate models. Scientists use these models to understand how Earth’s climate works and to make predictions about how it might change in the future.
Article
Created: May 31 2017
Updated: Apr 2 2018
Earth’s atmosphere is made up of many different gases, some of which are “greenhouse” gases. They are called that because they effectively act like a greenhouse or a layer of insulation for Earth: they trap heat and warm the planet. For the past couple of hundred years, human activities (such as burning coal to generate electricity and fuelling our vehicles with gas and diesel) have been changing the atmosphere by adding a huge volume of greenhouse gases. This has caused the greenhouse effect to become stronger, and is making the planet warmer.
Article
Created: Feb 17 2017
Updated: Apr 26 2018
Weather records from across Canada show that every year since 1998—that’s 20 years ago now—has been warmer than the 20th century average [1]. This means that a whole generation of Canadians has never experienced what most of modern history considered a “normal” Canadian climate. But it’s not just Canada, of course. The whole planet is getting warmer.