Keyword Community

Video
Created: Nov 7 2018
Updated: Nov 14 2018
At FortWhyte Alive’s solar-powered farm, young people are coming together to fight climate change, restore habitat and encourage biodiversity.
Video
Created: Apr 20 2018
Updated: Apr 20 2018
The Meechim project follows the story of Garden Hill First Nation – a northern Manitoba community that is only accessible via air and ice roads – and its journey to build a self-sustaining farm. Through a combination of both Indigenous and farm knowledge, the community’s efforts to attain food sovereignty show that climate resilience can lead to better social, economic, health and environmental outcomes for all.
Video
Created: Mar 30 2018
Updated: Apr 2 2018
Qapirangajuq is the world’s first Inuktitut language film about climate change and explores Inuit knowledge regarding ice, animals and the future of the Arctic. Co-Directed by acclaimed Inuk filmmaker Zacharias Kunuk (Atanarjuat The Fast Runner) and Dr. Ian Mauro, this film has been featured in major film festivals, academic conferences and news media globally. Click here to watch the full-length documentary
Video
Created: Mar 19 2018
Updated: Mar 31 2018
Toronto understands the importance of climate action. In recent years it has been hit by extreme weather that has adversely affected services, infrastructure and economic activities. The human impact of climate change is front and centre as the city works to increase its climate resilience, increase awareness about climate change, and to make urban life better.
Video
Created: Mar 26 2018
Updated: Mar 30 2018
Energy transitions are often considered a scientific or technical issue. However, University of Waterloo’s Imre Szeman argues that climate change is fundamentally a cultural issue. He argues that responding to climate change requires a shift in the way we think about cars, energy, chemicals, over-consumption, and other aspects of the fossil-fuel dependent “petrocultures” that permeate our everyday lives.
Video
Created: Mar 19 2018
Updated: Mar 30 2018
In 2009, Vancouver announced that it wanted to become the “Greenest City in the World by 2020”. Their action plan hopes to wean the city off fossil fuels and prioritizes pedestrians, bikes and transit when planning neighborhoods. As a result, Vancouver now has the lowest carbon emissions of any city in North America.
Video
Created: Mar 19 2018
Updated: Mar 30 2018
As their oil wells began to dry up, the small community of Montana First Nation was faced with an unemployment crisis. That’s when the idea of solar energy came up and the Nation founded Green Arrow, western Canada’s first Indigenous-owned and operated community solar energy company. Green Arrow’s team of trained community members is now installing solar panels across all of Alberta.
Video
Created: Mar 28 2018
Updated: Mar 31 2018
After a 1-in-100 year storm flooded Truro, Nova Scotia under five feet of water, the conversation around town shifted to questions about the future. What’s clear to local residents is that climate change is bringing higher tides, stronger winds and flooding, leaving more and more people shouldering the costs and risks.
Video
Created: Mar 28 2018
Updated: Mar 30 2018
Prince Edward Island is slowly disappearing into the ocean, in large part due to climate-change-related sea level rise and powerful storm surges which are increasing erosion of the island’s soft sandstone base. Tides have become noticeably different and have destroyed infrastructure including lighthouses, bridges, wharfs, streets, boardwalks, water wells, and sewer lines. As one resident remarks, “climate change is here and, if anyone doesn’t believe it, just get up and look out the window”.
Article
Created: Jul 25 2017
Updated: Apr 1 2018
The climate determines almost everything about how we design, build, and live in our cities. The streets and sidewalks, businesses and homes, parking lots and public transit that we use every day have been created to suit our climate. Now, with our climate changing, we need to re-think important aspects of how we live our urban lives.