Keyword Water

Article
Created: Jun 18 2021
Updated: Jun 21 2021
With summer temperatures starting to soar, many Canadians are eager to visit our favourite local beaches to break the heat. In many parts of the country, this means a trip to the nearest lake or river. Climate change is impacting waterbodies across the country, with lakes in Canada warming two times faster than other lakes in the world.[1] And with these changes come increased health risks. Higher temperatures and changing precipitation patterns make lakes more suitable for waterborne disease outbreaks.[2] As water quality worsens under climate change, beach closures and swimming advisories are expected to become more common.[3]
Video
Created: Jun 18 2021
Updated: Jun 21 2021
As summers become longer and hotter under climate change, many Canadians will be seeking relief at lake beaches. But hotter summers and changing precipitation make favourable conditions for algal blooms to grow in the water, which can produce toxins that are harmful to human health. Experts, Indigenous communities, and residents in the Lake Winnipeg area are all too familiar with the impacts of algal blooms on health, as they discuss in this video
Video
Created: Sep 16 2020
Updated: Sep 16 2020
Many of Canada’s forested watersheds are prone to increasing wildfires under climate change. Less vegetation and more erosion are just a few of the ways in which wildfires disrupt water availability and quality. This poses threats to human health and raises challenges for water management systems. Experts Monica Emelko and Francois Robinne explain the connections between wildfire, water, and the health of Canadians.
Article
Created: Feb 13 2020
Updated: Feb 14 2020
Wind-swept, remote, and jaw-droppingly beautiful. These are Quebec’s Îles-de-la-Madeleine. A narrow archipelago, surrounded on all sides by the unpredictable waters of the Gulf of St Lawrence, the islands are home to just under 13,000 souls who live mainly from fishing and tourism. Like many small islands around the globe, the consequences of climate change are altering life here dramatically. Islanders are coming together to grapple with this reality and find local solutions, and are asking hard questions about the future.