Keyword Climate models

Video
Created: May 6 2019
Updated: May 7 2019
Dominique Paquin of Ouranos specializes in climate data, modelling & projections. Decision-makers and everyday Canadians need to understand how these highly technical tools can be used to facilitate real change. In this video, Dominique breaks down the different parts of a model and explains how her work can help us understand and prepare for the future.
Article
Created: Sep 23 2018
Updated: Jul 10 2019
The Climate Atlas allows you to explore how climate change is likely to impact Canada’s vast and diverse forest ecosystems. Much hotter summers, milder winters, and changes in precipitation will likely lead to more frequent and intense forests fires, new invasive species, and an increase in pest outbreaks. Climate change may also make it possible for trees to thrive in previously inhospitable areas, like north of the current treeline or near the tops of mountains. Understanding the magnitude of these various changes and risks allows forest managers, emergency response coordinators, citizens, politicians, and planners to take meaningful action to mitigate and adapt.
Article
Created: Apr 18 2018
Updated: Jul 10 2019
The Climate Atlas allows you to explore how climate change is likely to impact Canada’s agricultural sector. Hotter temperatures and changes in precipitation may introduce new risks, while a longer growing season with more heat accumulation and fewer frost days may have some benefits. Of course none of these changes is projected to happen in isolation: the positive likelihood of a longer growing season co-exists with possibly damaging changes in patterns of seasonal precipitation and very high heat. Understanding the magnitude of these various changes and risks allows farmers, citizens, politicians, and planners to take meaningful action to mitigate and adapt.
Video
Created: Mar 19 2018
Updated: Apr 20 2018
Roy McLaren has a lifetime of farming experience: he’s farmed in southwest Manitoba for over 70 years. He looks at the Climate Atlas maps of climate projections with concern. “That is pretty bad,” he says, looking at maps showing a huge increase in very hot weather. “With that kind of heat,” McLaren muses, “we’d have to change our farming methods. We’d have to adopt new crops.”
Video
Created: Mar 28 2018
Updated: Sep 23 2018
Dendroclimatologist Dave Sauchyn studies tree rings to learn about climates of the past and what it means for the future. His research shows that there’s a “new normal” in the Canadian Prairies and that climate change is increasing the risk of extended and severe drought.
Article
Created: Feb 17 2017
Updated: Apr 2 2018
Earth’s climate has changed many times and many ways. We know a lot about the natural causes and effects of ancient climate change, and this knowledge helps us state with confidence that modern climate change is a product of human activity.
Article
Created: Mar 19 2018
Updated: Apr 2 2018
Climate and weather are intimately connected. As the climate around us changes, it will have a dramatic impact on the weather. But if we try to understand climate on the basis of how we think about weather, it’s easy to misinterpret the science and underestimate the risks of climate change.
Video
Created: Mar 19 2018
Updated: Apr 3 2018
Earth has warmed by 1 °C in just over 100 years. Damon Matthews, a climatologist from Concordia University, describes how this change in temperature is both human-caused and unparalleled in geologic history. Taking us through the evidence of our warming climate, Matthews discusses what these changes mean for Canada and suggests that the case for a dramatic policy response is very clear.
Article
Created: Mar 7 2018
Updated: Apr 2 2018
The most powerful computers on Earth are used to run climate models. Scientists use these models to understand how Earth’s climate works and to make predictions about how it might change in the future.
Article
Created: Feb 17 2017
Updated: Nov 13 2019
Weather records from across Canada show that every year since 1998—that’s 20 years ago now—has been warmer than the 20th century average [1]. This means that a whole generation of Canadians has never experienced what most of modern history considered a “normal” Canadian climate. But it’s not just Canada, of course. The whole planet is getting warmer.